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HIGH COLLAGEN
Vegan Boost®


Stimulates the body's
own collagen production




For beautiful skin, hair & nails,
strong connective tissue as well as
healthy joints, tendons & bones

HIGH COLLAGEN Vegan Boost®

The innovative plant based supplement that triggers the body to build and use native collagen

Collagen fibers are the central building blocks of all connective tissues. They support and stabilize fibers and tissues. Collagen is found almost everywhere in our body: in the skin, bones, muscles and tendons, in cartilage and in all connective tissues.

Our body produces collagen itself, but collagen formation slows down, already after the age of 20.
The result is brittle nails and hair, dry skin and wrinkles, muscle breakdown, inflexible joints and limited mobility.

To counteract this, it makes sense to support the body with high-quality collagen. HIGH COLLAGEN Vegan Boost® stimulates and promotes the body’s own collagen production. The body can again produce more collagen to fulfil the essential functions.

Collagen is more than a cosmetic product, it works from the inside, holistically on our whole body!

Do yourself something good & help your body
to produce more collagen!

HIGH COLLAGEN VEGAN. 100% VEGAN, 100% NATURAL, 0% ADDITIVES
Wertvolle Inhaltsstoffe: HIGH COLLAGEN Vegan Boost® ist eine Mischung aus Aminosäuren, die zusammen mit Induktoren (Vitamin C, Indischem Wassernabel & Ginseng) den menschlichen Körper dazu anregen, natives Kollagen zu verwenden und zu bilden.

Precious ingredients:

HIGH COLLAGEN Vegan Boost® is a blend of amino acids that together with inductors (Vitamin C, Centella Asiatica & Ginseng) stimulates the human body to use and create native collagen.

Hyaluronic acid is an additional, natural moisturizer for the skin, strengthens the skin barriers and reduces wrinkles.

VeCollal®

Mimics the profile of human Collagen type-1 and provides the body with all amino acids.

Collagen

Helps to reduce the depth of wrinkles and improves the skin elasticity. It ensures a firm complexion and strong connective tissue.

High Collagen Vegan Boost

Hyaluronic Acid

Is a natural moisturizer for the skin, strengthens the skin barrier and reduces wrinkles

Vitamin C

contributes to normal collagen production and skin function

Vegan collagen – Does it exist?

Only humans and animals can produce collagen. However, the body can easily form the necessary collagen itself, if it is sufficiently supplied with good amino acids.

HIGH COLLAGEN Vegan Boost®, contains all amino acids as well as special inducers that stimulates the body’s own collagen production. The mechanism of action of this innovative formulation has been confirmed by various clinical studies.

What is VeCollal®?

WISSENSCHAFTLICHE INNOVATION VeCollal® ist die weltweit erste pflanzliche (vegane) Kollagenalternative, die auf wissenschaftlichen Erkenntnissen basiert und von nachhaltiger Innovation inspiriert ist.

SCIENTIFIC INNOVATION

VeCollal® is the world’s first plant-based (vegan) collagen alternative. based on scientific evidence and inspired by sustainable innovation.

Analysis of human collagen

Developed in collaboration with skin tissue engineer Josué Jiménez Vázquez, PhD, and global private label leader Aminolabs, VeCollal® mimics the human collagen type 1 profile with plant-based ingredients

Vegan, plant-based

VeCollal® was developed with the environment in mind. Sustainable production and plant-based ingredients provide all the benefits of traditional animal-based collagen supplements

Principle of action VeCollal®

Collagen Type-1 Principle of action
* The principles that form the basis of VeCollal®, are supported by over 50 studies

HIGH COLLAGEN Vegan Boost® increases the body’s own collagen production, reduces wrinkles, helps the elasticity and hydration of the skin and helps your hair as well as your connective tissue strong and healthy.

VeCollal® provides the body the perfect building blocks for the production of Collagen type-1 by imitating the exact amino acid profile from human Collagen type-1. It can be considered as a biomimetic of Human collagen type-1.

VeCollal® aims to emulate the natural synthesis process for collagen type-1 using vegan analogues.

To ensure these building blocks are used to their best, carefully selected inductors signal the body to use the available amino acids for the production of collagen.*

A unique biomimetic of human Collagen type-1

The VeCollal® contained in HIGH COLLAGEN Vegan Boost® is a unique biomimetic of human collagen type-1. It has exactly the same amino acid profile as the collagen found in human collagen

The Vecollal contained in High Collagen Vegan Boost, a unique biomimetic of human collagen type 1, has exactly the same amino acid profile as the collagen found in human collagen.
vecollal clinical studies

Low carbon footprint
and clean Formula

Compared to bovine collagen, the production of VeCollal® has an 8 times lower CO2 emission. VeCollal® is an eco-friendly, sustainable and clean formulation for building collagen, naturally in our body.

vecollal clinical studies

Clinical studies

VeCollal® increases the collagen production by 134,97%

VeCollal® increases collagen production by 134,97%

VeCollal® has been proven, with in vitro research, that it can stimulate human fibroblast cells to secrete collagen by 134.97 %

Human skin fibroblasts were used (the main cell types involved in collagen synthesis).

Different concentrations of VeCollal® were tested in the culture medium and compared against the collagen expressed with cells without treatment (MOCK).

Our results showed that the VeCollal® formulation, at a concentration of 10 mg/ml, induces the synthesis of new collagen in the cells.

Clinical Efficacy Evaluation, in vivo

Preface: The aim of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of VeCollal® on skin beauty.

→ Sample: VeCollal® sachet (3.885 g/sachet)

  • Placebo sachet
  • Dosage: 1 sachet/day

Subjects: Total 15 adults (VeCollal® : Placebo = 10 : 5), aged 25-65 years old
Method: A placebo-controlled trial was conducted. The subjects were informed to consume 1 sachet of the VeCollal® or placebo everyday for 4 weeks. Each subject was required to undergo skin condition measurement and blood sampling at week 0, week 2, and week 4.
→ Test item:

  • Skin wrinkles
  • Skin collagen density

VeCollal® has potential to reduce wrinkles
and to boost collagen synthesis

After consuming VeCollal® sachet for 4 weeks, the average value of wrinkles was 12.5 % lower than first week. The ratio of the subjects who had an effective improvement to the total participants was 80.0 %.

After 4 weeks of taking VeCollal® Sachet
Wrinkle reduction with VeCollal

The measured collagen density of the skin has increased by an average of 4.7 %.

Kollagendichte

Hyaluroic acid

The hydration level of skin is the young feature. As the years of age increase, the water will gradually lose, slowly losing firmness and tenderness. Hyaluronan is a glycosaminoglycan, a natural moisturizing factor for the skin, and is widely found in the connective tissue of the human body.

The water retention capacity of hyaluronic acid is more powerful than other natural or synthetic polymers. In fact, one gram of hyaluronic acid can hold six liters of water (six thousand times absorption)

International Journal of Toxicology, July/August 2009

→ Improves skin moisture
→ Strengthen the skin barrier
→ Improves fine lines & wrinkles

SUPPORTING STUDIES IN THE FORMULATION OF VECOLLAL®

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  34. Lee, G.Y., et al., Effects of Panax ginseng extract on human dermal fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis. International wound journal, 2016. 13: p. 42-46.
  35. Lu, L., et al., Asiaticoside induction for cell‐cycle progression, proliferation and collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts. International Journal of Dermatology, 2004. 43(11): p. 801-807.
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  44. 7. Chen, X., et al., Panax ginseng total protein promotes proliferation and secretion of collagen in NIH/3T3 cells by activating extracellular signal-related kinase pathway. Journal of Ginseng Research, 2017. 41(3): p. 411-418.
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  46. 9. Lee, G.Y., et al., Effects of Panax ginseng extract on human dermal fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis. International wound journal, 2016. 13: p. 42-46.
  47. 10. Lu, L., et al., Asiaticoside induction for cell‐cycle progression, proliferation and collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts. International Journal of Dermatology, 2004. 43(11): p. 801-807.
  48. Nowwarote, N., et al., Asiaticoside induces type I collagen synthesis and osteogenic differentiation in human periodontal ligament cells. Phytotherapy Research, 2013. 27(3): p. 457-462.
  49. Paocharoen, V., The efficacy and side effects of oral Centella asiatica extract for wound healing promotion in diabetic wound patients. J Med Assoc Thai, 2010. 93(Suppl 7): p. S166-S170.
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  3. Osawa, Y., et al., Absorption and metabolism of orally administered collagen hydrolysates evaluated by the vascularly perfused rat intestine and liver in situ. Biomedical Research, 2018. 39(1): p. 1-11.
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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

About Collagen:

Collagen is the most abundant structural protein in the body. It is formed of building blocks called amino acids in a specific sequence and form. You can think of collagen of the glue that holds everything together and gives strength to tissues such as skin, bones, cartilage,…

Our skin notably consists of up to 70% of collagen of a certain type – Type-1. It is this collagen that gives skin its firmness and plumpness.

Yes. There has been considerable research in the effects of collagen supplementation (for instance https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26362110/). The commercial success of collagen supplements is also testimony to the effectiveness, as the trend would quickly die if no positive results were observed. VeCollal® was based on over 70 independent studies and its efficacy has been proven in 4 clinical trials to date.

Yes – providing the supplement is of high quality. Unfortunately, a recent study from the Clean Label organisation highlighted the potential presence of heavy metals in animal sourced collagen supplements. https://cleanlabelproject.org/collagen-study-infographic/.

The consumer should realize hides and bones contain heavy metals and high-quality production is necessary to ensure safe levels. Look for products from reputable brands, containing branded ingredients like HIGH COLLAGEN®. HIGH COLLAGEN® is made from high-quality raw materials that are free of heavy metals. Each batch used is carefully controlled and analyzed.

Nothing dramatic, but your body will revert to its old level of replenishment and will gradually show signs
of skin aging again.

Animal collagen is very hard to digest for a human, that is why animal collagen supplements are usually collagen peptides. Which simply put, this means the big collagen molecule has been cut into smaller pieces for easier absorption. These peptides are combinations of building blocks called amino acids. The body will digest the peptides and break them down into amino acids needed to help build collagen.

ABOUT HIGH COLLAGEN Vegan Boost®:

VeCollal® is a vegan biomimetic of human Collagen type-1. That sounds complicated, but what it means is that it has the exact same amino acid profile as human Collagen type-1 – this is what makes up most of the collagen in your skin and bones.
Collagen has certain building blocks (amino acids) in a specific ratio.

VeCollal® has the exact ratio as the collagen in human skin. This is unique, as animal collagen is similar to human collagen however, it is not identical. It even lacks some of the building blocks that are essential to humans (such as an amino acid called L-Tryptophan). VeCollal® brings the human body the perfect supply of building blocks to create new collagen. However, just having the building blocks is not enough to build effectively. For example, if we want to build a house, having the bricks alone doesn’t build the house, for that, you need instructions. That is why the patent pending VeCollal® ingredient also contains powerful herbal extracts that stimulate the body to use the bricks to start building. VeCollal® in essence uses the body’s own biochemistry
to replenish collagen.

Find out more here.

Collagen supplements are hugely popular, but the modern consumer is -thankfully- more and more concerned with sustainability and animal wellbeing. This is clearly demonstrated in the number of plant-based products growing on the market and sustainability efforts worldwide.
VeCollal® was created to answer the demand of the modern consumer who values sustainability, is vegan or vegetarian but still is unwilling to compromise on results.

No, it is a Vegan Collagen alternative. Meaning, it offers the body all the benefits of animal collagen in a sustainable animal friendly
way.

In one word: the science. Unfortunately, there are many products on the market labelling themselves as a
vegan collagen that have zero science behind them and are not
clinically proven. VeCollal® is different. Our formulation was created by collagen expert Dr. Jimenez, based on 70+ supporting studies, but we did not stop there. VeCollal® has been put through 4 clinical trials to date, always showing excellent results in real people. This is not simply self-evaluation
by sponsored subjects. Highly technology equipment is used to measure wrinkles,
collagen density, hydration etc. in a scientifically sound procedure. Our
most recent clinical trial has been conducted by an independent medical facility.

The results of our latest clinical trial match the results of similar trials done with animal collagen supplements. HIGH COLLAGEN Vegan Boost® with VeCollal® seems to achieve similar results but in a shorter timeframe (4 weeks), which we believe is due to the very high absorbability of VeCollal®, with molecular size 10 to 50 times smaller than collagen peptides.

VeCollal® delivers convincing results in just 4 weeks:

  1. 14.1% reduction in wrinkles
  2. 13.9% increase in collagen density
  3. 7.4% increase in skin hydration
  4. 16.3% reduction of skin redness
  5. 15.8% reduction in skin roughness

During the clinical trial, blood values and gastrointestinal discomfort were monitored – no side effects of any type were reported.

It’s calculated that the carbon footprint to make VeCollal® is 6.6 times less than when manufacturing animal based collagen. In addition, the manufacturing of VeCollal® is in a carbon neutral facility. We don’t stop there, we also compensate our carbon
footprint in transportation by replanting trees with our partner
Trees for All. We donate to tree planting projects. These projects not only supports the
plantation of new trees in Europe but also in Madagascar. Helping restore
endemic forests, endangered plant and animal species, as well as helping
the local community.